Gasps
Thursday, December 22, 2005
 
DIE WE DO

I found the interview with Noah Eli Gordon muy interesante over at the Here Comes Everybody Blog. And when he got to the last Q&A, it spurred a hay(na)ku:

10. What is the relationship between the text and the body in your writing?

That’s simple: I am destroying the body in order to bring out the text.


Here's my hay(na)ku response:

DIE WE DO

Die
we do
as much as

we
live. Then
we write: right

what
we lived
when we write.

Thursday, December 01, 2005
 
SCUMBLE
--after "The Bounty" by Derek Walcott


I cannot remember the name of that seacoast city,
but it trembled


.................................................it is near Dinard
a town with hyphens


Now, so many deaths


.................................................the only art left --
the preparation of grace



*********************

NOTES ON MY SCUMBLING PROCESS (FROM THE CHATELAINE'S POETICS):

IF TITIAN CAN SCUMBLE, SO CAN I!

Cabin fever here on the mountain. Rain, rain, RAIN! Was trapped all morning waiting for dog-player, who then cancelled anyway due to rain, rain, rain! It's pouring so heavily that she said an earlier dog-customer looked at her to proclaim, "Why are we out here? This rain hurts!"

Anyway, while trapped, wrote a new manuscript as a result of my engagement with Mina Loy. Title:

SCUMBLE SCRAMBLE

It's an ekphrastic project, too, hence the ref to "scumble", which is (per Merriam Webster):

scumble \SKUM-bul\ verb
1 a : to make (as color or a painting) less brilliant by covering with a thin coat of opaque or semiopaque color b : to apply (a color) in this manner
*2 : to soften the lines or colors of (a drawing) by rubbing lightly


Moreover, (per MW again): The history of "scumble" is blurry, but the word is thought to be related to the verb "scum," an obsolete form of "skim" (meaning "to pass lightly over"). Scumbling, as first perfected by artists such as Titian, involves passing dry, opaque coats of oil paint over a tinted background to create subtle tones and shadows. But although the painting technique dates to the 16th century, use of the word "scumble" is only known to have begun in the late 18th century. The more generalized "smudge" or "smear" sense appeared even later, in the mid-1800s.

So, while listening to the rain, I thought to scumble the poems in Mina Loy's THE LOST LUNAR BAEDEKER and, hey, another manuscript done!

[After my first scumbling attempt with Derek Walcott's THE BOUNTY, I then went after Mina Loy.]

Well, it's still raining. So, back to yawning with the dawgs...


Powered by Blogger